Diversity Spotlight Thursday #12: Bisexual Main Characters

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with three book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

How to Make a WishHow To Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake

All seventeen year-old Grace Glasser wants is her own life. A normal life in which she sleeps in the same bed for longer than three months and doesn’t have to scrounge for spare change to make sure the electric bill is paid. Emotionally trapped by her unreliable mother, Maggie, and the tiny cape on which she lives, she focuses on her best friend, her upcoming audition for a top music school in New York, and surviving Maggie’s latest boyfriend—who happens to be Grace’s own ex-boyfriend’s father.

Her attempts to lay low until she graduates are disrupted when she meets Eva, a girl with her own share of ghosts she’s trying to outrun. Grief-stricken and lonely, Eva pulls Grace into midnight adventures and feelings Grace never planned on. When Eva tells Grace she likes girls, both of their worlds open up. But, united by loss, Eva also shares a connection with Maggie. As Grace’s mother spirals downward, both girls must figure out how to love and how to move on.

I read an ARC of How To Make a Wish last year and it was definitely one of my favorite books of 2016. Maybe ever. The story is so heartbreaking but hopeful, and the characters meant so, so much to me. I still think about this book everyday, and I kind of want to reread it soon even though my tbr is massive already.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Assassins: Discord by Erica Cameron Assassins: Discord (Assassins, #1)

Kindra’s moral compass has never pointed north, but that’s what happens when you’re raised as an assassin and a thief. At sixteen, she’s fantastic with a blade, an expert at slipping through the world unnoticed, and trapped in a life she didn’t chose. But nothing in her training prepares her for what happens when her father misses a target.

In the week-long aftermath, Kindra breaks rank for the first time in her life. She steals documents, starts questioning who their client is and why the target needs to die, botches a second hit on her father’s target, and is nearly killed. And that’s before she’s kidnapped by a green-eyed stranger connected to a part of her childhood she’d almost forgotten.

Kindra has to decide who to trust and which side of the battle to fight for. She has to do it fast and she has to be right, because the wrong choice will kill her just when she’s finally found something worth living for.

I bought the ebook of Assassins: Discord when it was on sale for pride month. All I knew about this book was that it featured assassins and that the main character is bi, and honestly, I didn’t need to know more.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Like WaterLike Water by Rebecca Podos

A gorgeously written and deeply felt literary young adult novel of identity, millennial anxiety, and first love, from the widely acclaimed author of The Mystery of Hollow Places

In Savannah Espinoza’s small New Mexico hometown, kids either flee after graduation or they’re trapped there forever. Vanni never planned to get stuck—but that was before her father was diagnosed with Huntington’s disease, leaving her and her mother to care for him. Now, she doesn’t have much of a plan at all: living at home, working as a performing mermaid at a second-rate water park, distracting herself with one boy after another.

That changes the day she meets Leigh. Disillusioned with small-town life and looking for something greater, Leigh is not a “nice girl.” She is unlike anyone Vanni has met, and a friend when Vanni desperately needs one. Soon enough, Leigh is much more than a friend. But caring about another person stirs up the moat Vanni has carefully constructed around herself, and threatens to bring to the surface the questions she’s held under for so long.

With her signature stunning writing, Rebecca Podos, author of The Mystery of Hollow Places, has crafted a story of first love and of the complex ways in which the deepest parts of us are hidden, even from ourselves.

I was lucky enough to read this book early. I finished it last week and *enter some random swear words here* it was SO GOOD! I don’t want to spoil anything for you all, but what I appreciated most about this book is how messy the characters are. Not problematic, just real. They also had so much character growth throughout the book, and it was wonderful.

What is your favorite book with a bisexual main character?

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and LonelinessTwitter • Instagram •  Goodreads

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #11 – The F/F Romance Edition

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with three book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

The Paths We Choose (Lillac Town, #2)The Paths We Choose by M. Hollis

Lily Ferrari enjoys having control over every detail of her life. Ever since she left her parents’ house to gain her freedom, she decided to fully own her autonomy. But an unexpected visit from her little brother may change the path she chooses to follow.
Add to that a casual fling with the bright architect Mayte González, and Lily’s summer is turning out more interesting than she expected. It certainly beats the routine of working extra shifts at Johnson’s Bookstore.
A few weeks before her college life begins, Lily needs to figure out if she’s wrong about the past or if she should continue to protect her heart at all costs.

Sometimes moving forward is only possible if you have the right people by your side.

Will I ever be able to shut up about this novella? I honestly don’t think so. This is just the most perfect f/f romance I’ve read (so far) and it makes me so incredibly happy. I definitely want to reread this soon.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Strawberry SummerStrawberry Summer by Melissa Brayden

Just because you’re through with your past, doesn’t mean it’s through with you.

Margaret Beringer didn’t have an easy adolescence. She hated her name, was less than popular in school, and was always cast aside as a “farm kid.” However, with the arrival of Courtney Carrington, Margaret’s youth sparked into color. Courtney was smart, beautiful, and put together—everything Margaret wasn’t. Who would have imagined that they’d fit together so perfectly?

But first loves can scar.

Margaret hasn’t seen Courtney in years and that’s for the best. But when Courtney loses her father and returns to Tanner Peak to take control of the family store, Margaret comes face-to-face with her past and the woman she’s tried desperately to forget. The fact that Courtney has grown up more beautiful than ever certainly doesn’t help matters.

Strawberry Summer has been on my TBR for quite some time now, because I was saving it for summer. It just seemed like an incredibly summer-y book, which *might* have something to do with the title. I honestly can’t wait to pick this up, because it seems like it’s going to be very swoon-worthy.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

The Story of Lizzy and DarcyThe Story of Lizzy and Darcy by Grace Watson

When Lizzy Bennet first meets Darcy Williams, there is an instant dislike between them. As much as they try to avoid it their paths keep crossing, and they each start to see a different side to the other. Their tentative friendship is soon tested, but will they realise how they really feel?

The Story of Lizzy and Darcy is a modern day, same-sex adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice

I saw someone talking about this on Twitter the other day (I don’t remember who, so if it was you please let me know so I can give you credit!!) (Update: it was the incredible Tasha from Cats and Paperbacks!!) and I got so incredibly excited about this book! Pride and Prejudice is the only classic I kind of liked, and an f/f version of that? SIGN ME UP. Also, this book is releasing TODAY!!

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and LonelinessTwitter Instagram •  Goodreads

 

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #10

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with three book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

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Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens AgendaSimon Vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.

With some messy dynamics emerging in his once tight-knit group of friends, and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon’s junior year has suddenly gotten all kinds of complicated. Now, change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met.

Now that the Upside of Unrequited might show up on my doorstep any day (please let it be soon!!) I thought it was time to feature Simon!

I read Simon a few years ago, and I loved it so much! It’s such a cute and happy story, and Becky Albertalli’s writing was amazing. Also, they’re in the process of filming the movie and I couldn’t be more excited??? It might also have something to do with the fact that Nick Robinson is cast as Simon, and I always had a little crush on him, haha.

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The Reader (Sea of Ink and Gold, #1)The Reader by Traci Chee

Once there was, and one day there will be. This is the beginning of every story.

Sefia lives her life on the run. After her father is viciously murdered, she flees to the forest with her aunt Nin, the only person left she can trust. They survive in the wilderness together, hunting and stealing what they need, forever looking over their shoulders for new threats. But when Nin is kidnapped, Sefia is suddenly on her own, with no way to know who’s taken Nin or where she is. Her only clue is a strange rectangular object that once belonged to her father left behind, something she comes to realize is a book.

Though reading is unheard of in Sefia’s world, she slowly learns, unearthing the book’s closely guarded secrets, which may be the key to Nin’s disappearance and discovering what really happened the day her father was killed. With no time to lose, and the unexpected help of swashbuckling pirates and an enigmatic stranger, Sefia sets out on a dangerous journey to rescue her aunt, using the book as her guide. In the end, she discovers what the book had been trying to tell her all along: Nothing is as it seems, and the end of her story is only the beginning.

I have heard nothing but great things about The Readers from friends and reviewers I trust, so I feel like this book is going to be a favorite of mine. And that cover??? GORGEOUS. I’m honestly just waiting for the paperback to come out so I can have the most amazing reading experience, because y’all know I hate hardbacks.

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How to Make a WishHow to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake

All seventeen year-old Grace Glasser wants is her own life. A normal life in which she sleeps in the same bed for longer than three months and doesn’t have to scrounge for spare change to make sure the electric bill is paid. Emotionally trapped by her unreliable mother, Maggie, and the tiny cape on which she lives, she focuses on her best friend, her upcoming audition for a top music school in New York, and surviving Maggie’s latest boyfriend—who happens to be Grace’s own ex-boyfriend’s father.

Her attempts to lay low until she graduates are disrupted when she meets Eva, a girl with her own share of ghosts she’s trying to outrun. Grief-stricken and lonely, Eva pulls Grace into midnight adventures and feelings Grace never planned on. When Eva tells Grace she likes girls, both of their worlds open up. But, united by loss, Eva also shares a connection with Maggie. As Grace’s mother spirals downward, both girls must figure out how to love and how to move on.

I could hardly choose the book I was going to use for ‘a book releasing soon’ this week, because there are so many books coming out on May 2nd that I’ve either read and loved, or am incredibly excited about. How to Make a Wish falls under the first option.

I loved this book so so much, and it means so much to me. If you want to know why, you can check out my full review here.

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and Loneliness
Twitter Instagram •  Goodreads

 

 

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #9

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Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with three book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

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Tiny Pretty Things (Tiny Pretty Things, #1)Tiny Pretty Things by Dhonielle Clayton and Sona Charaipotra

Gigi, Bette, and June, three top students at an exclusive Manhattan ballet school, have seen their fair share of drama. Free-spirited new girl Gigi just wants to dance—but the very act might kill her. Privileged New Yorker Bette’s desire to escape the shadow of her ballet star sister brings out a dangerous edge in her. And perfectionist June needs to land a lead role this year or her controlling mother will put an end to her dancing dreams forever. When every dancer is both friend and foe, the girls will sacrifice, manipulate, and backstab to be the best of the best.

I just looked through my shelves trying to find the perfect books for this week’s Diversity Spotlight Thursday and I realized that I hadn’t even reviewed this book yet. I need to get to that soon!
Anyway, I LOVED Tiny Pretty Things. I usually never go for books with multiple POV but in this book it just works. I loved the rivalry between the students, which was incredibly entertaining but got so incredibly dark sometimes, but I most of all loved the characters. They all felt incredibly real, and even though some were incredibly shitty, I couldn’t help but love them. And Gigi is definitely my new book girlfriend.

e6dae-tbr1Beginner's Guide: Love and Other Chemical Reactions

Beginner’s Guide: Love and Other Chemical Reactions by Six de los Reyes

Falling in love is a chemical reaction.

Just ask Kaya Rubio, twenty-five year-old Molecular Genetics graduate student and research assistant. Fed up with her spinster aunts’ relentless reminders and unsolicited advice regarding her Single Since Birth status, she designs a scientific, evidence-based methodology to find her a suitable partner in time for her cousin’s wedding. As any good scientist knows, any valid experimental design requires a negative control. Enter the most unsuitable candidate for a potential boyfriend: the messy, easygoing, café owner Nero Sison. Her null hypothesis? Going out with Nero would establish her baseline data without catalyzing the chemical reaction she seeks.

But when Kaya’s recorded results refuse to make sense, she is forced to come to the conclusion that there are some things in life that are simply, by nature, irrational and illogical. And that sometimes, chemistry doesn’t always happen inside a lab.

Can I go one week without mentioning a #romanceclass book? Eh, probably not.
Beginner’s Guide has a female scientist as a main character and I love that! I don’t see enough scientist ladies in books. I’ve heard nothing but great things about this one, so I can’t wait to finally pick it up soon.

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The Paths We Choose (Lillac Town, #2)The Paths We Choose by Maria Hollis

Lily Ferrari enjoys having control over every detail of her life. Ever since she left her parents’ house to gain her freedom, she decided to fully own her autonomy. But an unexpected visit from her little brother may change the path she chooses to follow.
Add to that a casual fling with the bright architect Mayte González, and Lily’s summer is turning out more interesting than she expected. It certainly beats the routine of working extra shifts at Johnson’s Bookstore.
A few weeks before her college life begins, Lily needs to figure out if she’s wrong about the past or if she should continue to protect her heart at all costs.

Sometimes moving forward is only possible if you have the right people by your side.

THE PATHS WE CHOOSE IS RELEASING SOON SOS. I read an ARC of this a few weeks ago after loving the first book in this series, The Melody of You and Me, and I loved it so much! It has amazing female friendships, an adorable f/f relationship, sex-positivity, an incredible main character and great scenes with a younger brother that made me cry. You should all pick this up. Seriously. If you’re not convinced yet, check out my review here.

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and LonelinessTwitter Instagram •  Goodreads

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #8

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with three book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

The Forbidden Wish (The Forbidden Wish, #1)

The Forbidden Wish by Jessica Khoury

She is the most powerful Jinni of all. He is a boy from the streets. Their love will shake the world…

When Aladdin discovers Zahra’s jinni lamp, Zahra is thrust back into a world she hasn’t seen in hundreds of years—a world where magic is forbidden and Zahra’s very existence is illegal. She must disguise herself to stay alive, using ancient shape-shifting magic, until her new master has selected his three wishes.

But when the King of the Jinn offers Zahra a chance to be free of her lamp forever, she seizes the opportunity—only to discover she is falling in love with Aladdin. When saving herself means betraying him, Zahra must decide once and for all: is winning her freedom worth losing her heart?

As time unravels and her enemies close in, Zahra finds herself suspended between danger and desire in this dazzling retelling of Aladdin from acclaimed author Jessica Khoury

I received The Forbidden Wish by Jessica Khoury in a Fairyloot box once, and it spend almost a year sitting on my TBR. When I finally picked it up, I kind of hated myself for not picking it up sooner.
The Forbidden Wish is an Aladdin retelling which puts the original to shame. It has great characters, a very interesting world and a great romance, and it’s certainly one I’d recommend.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3Binti (Binti, #1)

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself – but first she has to make it there, alive.

Binti was my very first ebook purchase when I got my Kindle. I have heard so many amazing things about it that I just couldn’t resist it, even though I was kind of on a book buying ban. I’m definitely planning to pick this one up, once I finish the 5 books I’m reading now. And no, I’m not kidding about reading 5 books.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

The GauntletThe Gauntlet by Karuna Riazi

A trio of friends from New York City find themselves trapped inside a mechanical board game that they must dismantle in order to save themselves and generations of other children in this action-packed debut that’s a steampunk Jumanji with a Middle Eastern flair.

When twelve-year-old Farah and her two best friends get sucked into a mechanical board game called The Gauntlet of Blood and Sand—a puzzle game akin to a large Rubik’s cube—they know it’s up to them to defeat the game’s diabolical architect in order to save themselves and those who are trapped inside, including her baby brother Ahmed. But first they have to figure out how.

Under the tutelage of a lizard guide named Henrietta Peel and an aeronaut Vijay, the Farah and her friends battle camel spiders, red scorpions, grease monkeys, and sand cats as they prepare to face off with the maniacal Lord Amari, the man behind the machine. Can they defeat Amari at his own game…or will they, like the children who came before them, become cogs in the machine?

I don’t think I can tell you how incredibly excited I am to get my hands on The Gauntlet. It’s one of my most anticipated 2017 releases, and I’m so happy that the wait for this book is almost over because I really can’t wait any longer.
The premise of this book sounds amazing, the cover is beautiful, and Karuna Riazi is such an incredible person and I can’t wait to read her work. (Also, if you’re not following her on Twitter yet, you’re missing out).

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and LonelinessTwitter Instagram •  Goodreads

Diversity Spotlight Thursday

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with three book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Peter DarlingPeter Darling by Austin Chant

Ten years ago, Peter Pan left Neverland to grow up, leaving behind his adolescent dreams of boyhood and resigning himself to life as Wendy Darling. Growing up, however, has only made him realize how inescapable his identity as a man is.

But when he returns to Neverland, everything has changed: the Lost Boys have become men, and the war games they once played are now real and deadly. Even more shocking is the attraction Peter never knew he could feel for his old rival, Captain Hook—and the realization that he no longer knows which of them is the real villain.

I got an ARC of Peter Darling through Netgalley, and I really really enjoyed it. I loved the authors re-imagining of Neverland, and I loved how athmospheric the writing was. I also really enjoyed the characters (especially Hook), and the romantic relationship between Peter and Hook.

I really loved the ending of the book, and it made me fall in love with Peter and Hook even more. And I kind of want a book all about Ernest. Or Tink. It was excellent, and I can’t wait to read more of Austin Chant”s work.
Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

The Unforgettables

The Unforgettables by GL Thomas

Back home in Chicago, Paul Hiroshima had it all.

Popularity, charming looks and a talent for the arts that made him admired by his peers. Moving to Portland, Maine the summer before his senior year was going to change all that. With his city life behind him, there was definitely no reason to make the best out of a bad situation—that is, until he meets the amazing Felicia Abelard.

Over a love of comic books and secret identities, Felicia becomes the sidekick to his hero; there’s just one problem: they weren’t supposed to fall in love.

As the season comes to an end, Paul and Felicia face in-depth challenges to preserve their summer formed bond. With the brink of the new school year at hand, this tale of best friends and first loves will make their year unforgettable.

I have to admit that I don’t know a lot about this one, and I don’t really want to. I don’t like to go into romance books already knowing the plotline. All I know is that a few of my Twitter/blogging friends liked it, and that it features an interracial romance. So, when I saw it in the kindle store for $3 I knew I had to get it. I’m really excited to get to it soon.
Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3
Queens of GeekQueens of Geek by Jen Wilde

When BFFs Charlie, Taylor and Jamie go to SupaCon, they know it’s going to be a blast. What they don’t expect is for it to change their lives forever.

Charlie likes to stand out. SupaCon is her chance to show fans she’s over her public breakup with co-star, Jason Ryan. When Alyssa Huntington arrives as a surprise guest, it seems Charlie’s long-time crush on her isn’t as one-sided as she thought.

While Charlie dodges questions about her personal life, Taylor starts asking questions about her own.

Taylor likes to blend in. Her brain is wired differently, making her fear change. And there’s one thing in her life she knows will never change: her friendship with Jamie—no matter how much she may secretly want it to. But when she hears about the Queen Firestone SupaFan Contest, she starts to rethink her rules on playing it safe.

Queens of Geek is releasing very very soon (the Tuesday after this post goes up!!) and I’m incredibly excited about it. I’ve seen nothing but glowing reviews for this one, and just the idea of a romance with something like comic con as a backdrop sounds amazing to me. I really can’t wait to pick this one up.

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and LonelinessTwitter Instagram •  Goodreads

 

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #5

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3
Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with one book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.
Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

If The Dress Fits

 

If the Dress Fits by Carla de Guzman

Martha Aguas kind of has it all–she’s an accountant who loves numbers, an accident-prone puppy that loves her, and the perfect wardrobe.

Yes, she wears a dress size 24, her bras don’t fit and she’s never had a boyfriend, but so what?

It becomes a big deal when her perfect cousin Regina announces her engagement to Enzo, the only boy she’s ever loved (he doesn’t know, so don’t tell him!) Suddenly Aguases from all corners of the globe are coming for the event, and the last thing Martha wants is to be asked why she still prefers her lattes with a waffle on the side.

Thank god for Max. Goofy, funny, dependable Max, who finds himself playing the fake boyfriend at the family festivities. But why does it feel like only one of them is pretending?

I finished this book yesterday and I can’t stop thinking about how much I loved it. I loved reading about a fat girl loving herself, and getting the hot (veterinarian!!) guy. I loved the cultural aspects this book featured, and I loved al the tasty Filipino food it mentioned. I also loved the family aspects, and well, I loved everything.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3
On the Edge of GoneOn The Edge of Gone by Corinne Duyvis

January 29, 2035.

That’s the day the comet is scheduled to hit—the big one. Denise and her mother and sister, Iris, have been assigned to a temporary shelter near their hometown of Amsterdam to wait out the blast, but Iris is nowhere to be found, and at the rate Denise’s drug-addicted mother is going, they’ll never reach the shelter in time.

Then a last-minute encounter leads them to something better than a temporary shelter: a generation ship that’s scheduled to leave Earth behind and colonize new worlds after the comet hits. But each passenger must have a practical skill to contribute. Denise is autistic and fears that she’ll never be allowed to stay. Can she obtain a spot before the ship takes flight? What about her mother and sister?

When the future of the human race is at stake, whose lives matter most?

It’s been a while since I’ve read a dystopian, but when I spotted this one, I knew I had to read it. And yes, it might have something to do with the space ship.
On the Edge of Gone is also an #OwnVoices book featuring an autistic main character, which is something I’m incredibly excited to read about. And the book is written by a fellow Dutchie, so what’s not to love?

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Dreadnought (Nemesis, #1)Dreadnought by April Daniels

Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of the world’s greatest superhero. Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, she was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But then her second-hand superpowers transformed her body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

It should be the happiest time of her life, but between her father’s dangerous obsession with curing her girlhood, her best friend suddenly acting like he’s entitled to date her, and the classmate who is secretly a masked vigilante, Danny’s first weeks living in a body that fits her are more difficult and complicated than she could have imagined.

She doesn’t have much time to adjust. Dreadnought’s murderer, a cyborg named Utopia, still haunts the streets of New Port City. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.

I am so excited about Dreadnought! I don’t read enough books with trans main characters, and I’ve never read a superhero book before, and I’m excited to change that!

Have you read any of these books, and what did you think?

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and LonelinessTwitter Instagram •  Goodreads

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #4

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with one book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Some Kind of HappinessSome Kind of Happiness by Claire Legrand

THINGS FINLEY HART DOESN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT

• Her parents, who are having problems. (But they pretend like they’re not.)
• Being sent to her grandparents’ house for the summer.
• Never having met said grandparents.
• Her blue days—when life feels overwhelming, and it’s hard to keep her head up. (This happens a lot.)

Finley’s only retreat is the Everwood, a forest kingdom that exists in the pages of her notebook. Until she discovers the endless woods behind her grandparents’ house and realizes the Everwood is real–and holds more mysteries than she’d ever imagined, including a family of pirates that she isn’t allowed to talk to, trees covered in ash, and a strange old wizard living in a house made of bones.

With the help of her cousins, Finley sets out on a mission to save the dying Everwood and uncover its secrets. But as the mysteries pile up and the frightening sadness inside her grows, Finley realizes that if she wants to save the Everwood, she’ll first have to save herself.

Reality and fantasy collide in this powerful, heartfelt novel about family, depression, and the power of imagination.

I’ve already gushed a lot about this book since I’ve read it, and I just can’t stop. Some Kind of Happiness tells such a beautiful story, and is such a honest and real portrayal of depression and anxiety. I loved this book so, so much and that’s exactly why I keep talking about it. So that you might pick it up, and fall in love with it yourself.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Tell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel by Sara FarizanTell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel

High-school junior Leila has made it most of the way through Armstead Academy without having a crush on anyone, which is something of a relief. Her Persian heritage already makes her different from her classmates; if word got out that she liked girls, life would be twice as hard. But when a sophisticated, beautiful new girl, Saskia, shows up, Leila starts to take risks she never thought she would, especially when it looks as if the attraction between them is mutual. Struggling to sort out her growing feelings and Saskia’s confusing signals, Leila confides in her old friend, Lisa, and grows closer to her fellow drama tech-crew members, especially Tomas, whose comments about his own sexuality are frank, funny, wise, and sometimes painful. Gradually, Leila begins to see that almost all her classmates are more complicated than they first appear to be, and many are keeping fascinating secrets of their own.

I received this book from my lovely friend Femke for Christmas and I’m so excited to pick it up! Besides loving the cover, I’ve been wanting to pick up more cute f/f romances, and this book seems to be just that.

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

A List of CagesA List of Cages by Robin Roe

When Adam Blake lands the best elective ever in his senior year, serving as an aide to the school psychologist, he thinks he’s got it made. Sure, it means a lot of sitting around, which isn’t easy for a guy with ADHD, but he can’t complain, since he gets to spend the period texting all his friends. Then the doctor asks him to track down the troubled freshman who keeps dodging her, and Adam discovers that the boy is Julian–the foster brother he hasn’t seen in five years.

Adam is ecstatic to be reunited. At first, Julian seems like the boy he once knew. He’s still kind hearted. He still writes stories and loves picture books meant for little kids. But as they spend more time together, Adam realizes that Julian is keeping secrets, like where he hides during the middle of the day, and what’s really going on inside his house. Adam is determined to help him, but his involvement could cost both boys their lives.

I’m extremely excited about A List of Cages by Robin Roe because it has a main character who has ADHD, and I’ve never read about that before. A few people really close to me have ADHD, so I’m very interested to see what it’s like for them. What’s going on inside their head. I really hope this book will give me just that.

Besides this, A List of Cages sounds like it’s going to be a beautiful but heart-wrenching story, and I can’t wait to pick it up.

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and Loneliness Twitter Instagram •  Goodreads

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #3

Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with one book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet. 

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

The Rest of Us Just Live HereWhat if you aren’t the Chosen One?The one who’s supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever the heck this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death?What if you’re like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school. Again.Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week’s end of the world, and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life.Even if your best friend is worshipped by mountain lions.Award-winning writer Patrick Ness’s bold and irreverent novel powerfully reminds us that there are many different types of remarkable.

Even though The Rest of Us Just Live Here is probably the lowest rated YA Patrick Ness book on Goodreads, it’s probably my most loved one. The plot might not be the greatest, but the characters definitely are! The entire cast of characters is incredibly diverse, and I loved every single one of them.

Iron Cast by Destiny Soria

Iron CastIn 1919, Ada Navarra—the intrepid daughter of immigrants—and Corinne Wells—a spunky, devil-may-care heiress—make an unlikely pair. But at the Cast Iron nightclub in Boston, anything and everything is possible. At night, on stage together, the two best friends, whose “afflicted” blood gives them the ability to create illusions through art, weave magic under the employ of Johnny Dervish, the club’s owner and a notorious gangster. By day, Ada and Corinne use these same skills to con the city’s elite in an attempt to keep the club afloat.When a “job” goes awry and Ada is imprisoned, she realizes they’re on the precipice of danger. Only Corinne—her partner in crime—can break her out of Haversham Asylum. But once Ada is out, they face betrayal at every turn.

Iron Cast is one of the books that are on my #DiversityDecBingo TBR! I haven’t read a lot of historical fiction yet, and I haven’t been a huge fan of what I did read, but I’m excited to give this one a go anyway.

Our Own Private Universe by Robin Talley

Our Own Private Universe

 

Fifteen-year-old Aki Hunter knows she’s bisexual, but up until now she’s only dated guys—and her best friend, Lori, is the only person she’s out to. When she and Lori set off on a four-week youth-group mission trip in a small Mexican town, it never crosses Aki’s mind that there might be anyone in the group she’d be interested in dating. But that all goes out the window when Aki meets Christa.

I was extremely excited about this book when I first heard of it. The synopsis sounds great, the cover is gorgeous, and I’ve been wanting to read more books with bi MCs. Then there were some things said on Twitter, which made me erase this one from my TBR, but in the end, put it back on there. (I don’t feel like going into it in this post.)

However, the things that happened have made me a bit more hesistant in picking this one up, so I think I’ll wait and read some reviews before I pick it up.

Some Thoughts on the Bookish Community and Loneliness

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #1

Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with one book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet. 

I have been eyeing this meme for a while now because it looked amazing, and I finally decided to go for it. 


The Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig

The Girl from Everywhere (The Girl from Everywhere, #1)


Nix has spent her entire life aboard her father’s ship, sailing across the centuries, across the world, across myth and imagination.As long as her father has a map for it, he can sail to any time, any place, real or imagined: nineteenth-century China, the land from One Thousand and One Nights, a mythic version of Africa. Along the way they have found crewmates and friends, and even a disarming thief who could come to mean much more to Nix.
But the end to it all looms closer every day.
Her father is obsessed with obtaining the one map, 1868 Honolulu, that could take him back to his lost love, Nix’s mother. Even though getting it—and going there—could erase Nix’s very existence.
For the first time, Nix is entering unknown waters.
She could find herself, find her family, find her own fantastical ability, her own epic love.
Or she could disappear.

I read The Girl From Everywhere back in June, and even though it wasn’t as I expected, I really enjoyed it. Heidi’s writing style is absolutely delicious, and the way she described the scenery was amazing. It felt like I was there. I also immensely enjoyed the characters. I loved the whole pirate crew, and I really liked our main character Nix. If you want to know more of my thoughts, you can check out my review here.
Besides writing amazing books, Heidi also writes some amazing tweets and I’d strongly suggest following her on Twitter.

 

 

Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall

 

 

Under Rose-Tainted Skies

Norah has agoraphobia and OCD. When groceries are left on the porch, she can’t step out to get them. Struggling to snag the bags with a stick, she meets Luke. He’s sweet and funny, and he just caught her fishing for groceries. Because of course he did.Norah can’t leave the house, but can she let someone in? As their friendship grows deeper, Norah realizes Luke deserves a normal girl. One who can lie on the front lawn and look up at the stars. One who isn’t so screwed up.

I have been hearing amazing things about this book from a lot of people, but I have never really been tempted to read this book before. This book deals with agoraphobia and anxiety, two things I deal with daily, and reading about them just wasn’t a good idea. Luckily, I’m feeling better now and I decided it was time to finally pick this one up. I ordered it last week, and I can’t wait to dive into it!

The Blazing Star by Imani Josey


The Blazing Star

Sixteen-year-old Portia White is used to being overlooked—after all, her twin sister Alex is a literal genius.But when Portia holds an Egyptian scarab beetle during history class, she takes center stage in a way she never expected: she faints. Upon waking, she is stronger, faster, and braver than before. And when she accidentally touches the scarab again?She wakes up in ancient Egypt—her sister and an unwitting freshman in tow.Great.Mysterious and beautiful, Egypt is more than they could have ever imagined from their days in the classroom. History comes alive as the three teens realize that getting back to the present will be the most difficult thing they’ve ever done. Stalked by vicious monsters called Scorpions, every step in the right direction means a step closer to danger.As Portia and the girls discover that they’re linked to the past by more than just chance, they have to decide what it truly means to be yourself, to love your sister, and to find your way home.

When I saw this one on Netgalley, read it’s synopsis and spotted the words ‘ancient Egypt’ ‘time travel’ and ‘monsters’, I was hooked. Luckily, my review request got accepted and I’m currently reading it! I’m 30% in so far and I’m not loving it yet, but I’m sure it’s going to get better.