Diversity Spotlight Thursday #2

Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with one book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet.

GeorgeGeorge by Alex Gino

‘BE WHO YOU ARE.When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She knows she’s a girl.
George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part . . . because she’s a boy.

With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan. Not just so she can be Charlotte — but so everyone can know who she is, once and for all.’

I read George as part of the #DiverseAThon a few months ago and I really enjoyed it! I adored George’s character and her relationship with her best friend Kelly. It was a very cute and heartwarming story, and I finished it in one sitting. 

When The Moon Was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore

When the Moon Was OursTo everyone who knows them, best friends Miel and Sam are as strange as they are inseparable. Roses grow out of Miel’s wrist, and rumors say that she spilled out of a water tower when she was five. Sam is known for the moons he paints and hangs in the trees, and for how little anyone knows about his life before he and his mother moved to town. But as odd as everyone considers Miel and Sam, even they stay away from the Bonner girls, four beautiful sisters rumored to be witches. Now they want the roses that grow from Miel’s skin, convinced that their scent can make anyone fall in love. And they’re willing to use every secret Miel has fought to protect to make sure she gives them up.

I picked this one up after reading about how diverse the cast of characters is, how beautiful the writing is and how amazing the relationships in this book are in this review . I’m incredibly excited about this one, and it’s a short one too, so I’m sure I’ll get to it soon!

Wing JonesWing Jones by Katherine Webber


Jandy Nelson meets Friday Night Lights: a sweeping story about love and family from an exceptional new voice in YA. With a grandmother from China and another from Ghana, fifteen-year-old Wing Jones is often caught between worlds. But when tragedy strikes, Wing discovers a talent for running she never knew she had. Wing’s speed could bring her family everything it needs. It could also stop Wing getting the one thing she wants.

Wing Jones has been on my radar for a while, but I thought it was just your typical sporty YA contemporary, so I was never very tempted to pick it up. Then, last Sunday, there was a #SundayYA chat with a few authors with books coming out in 2017. Katherine Webber was one of them. A lot of the other authors and participants in the chat spoke very highly of Wing Jones, so I decided to take a look at it again. The second line of the synopsis (‘ With a grandmother from China and another from Ghana, fifteen-year-old Wing Jones is often caught between worlds‘) swayed me, and I can’t wait to get my hands on this book! (And one of the authors said that Wing Jones inspired her to start running again and, well, who doesn’t want that?)
Wing Jones will be released in January of 2017. 

 

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #1

Diversity Spotlight Thurday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Aimal from Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Every week, you come up with one book fitting three different categories: a diverse book you’ve read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR, and a diverse book that has not been released yet. 

I have been eyeing this meme for a while now because it looked amazing, and I finally decided to go for it. 


The Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig

The Girl from Everywhere (The Girl from Everywhere, #1)


Nix has spent her entire life aboard her father’s ship, sailing across the centuries, across the world, across myth and imagination.As long as her father has a map for it, he can sail to any time, any place, real or imagined: nineteenth-century China, the land from One Thousand and One Nights, a mythic version of Africa. Along the way they have found crewmates and friends, and even a disarming thief who could come to mean much more to Nix.
But the end to it all looms closer every day.
Her father is obsessed with obtaining the one map, 1868 Honolulu, that could take him back to his lost love, Nix’s mother. Even though getting it—and going there—could erase Nix’s very existence.
For the first time, Nix is entering unknown waters.
She could find herself, find her family, find her own fantastical ability, her own epic love.
Or she could disappear.

I read The Girl From Everywhere back in June, and even though it wasn’t as I expected, I really enjoyed it. Heidi’s writing style is absolutely delicious, and the way she described the scenery was amazing. It felt like I was there. I also immensely enjoyed the characters. I loved the whole pirate crew, and I really liked our main character Nix. If you want to know more of my thoughts, you can check out my review here.
Besides writing amazing books, Heidi also writes some amazing tweets and I’d strongly suggest following her on Twitter.

 

 

Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall

 

 

Under Rose-Tainted Skies

Norah has agoraphobia and OCD. When groceries are left on the porch, she can’t step out to get them. Struggling to snag the bags with a stick, she meets Luke. He’s sweet and funny, and he just caught her fishing for groceries. Because of course he did.Norah can’t leave the house, but can she let someone in? As their friendship grows deeper, Norah realizes Luke deserves a normal girl. One who can lie on the front lawn and look up at the stars. One who isn’t so screwed up.

I have been hearing amazing things about this book from a lot of people, but I have never really been tempted to read this book before. This book deals with agoraphobia and anxiety, two things I deal with daily, and reading about them just wasn’t a good idea. Luckily, I’m feeling better now and I decided it was time to finally pick this one up. I ordered it last week, and I can’t wait to dive into it!

The Blazing Star by Imani Josey


The Blazing Star

Sixteen-year-old Portia White is used to being overlooked—after all, her twin sister Alex is a literal genius.But when Portia holds an Egyptian scarab beetle during history class, she takes center stage in a way she never expected: she faints. Upon waking, she is stronger, faster, and braver than before. And when she accidentally touches the scarab again?She wakes up in ancient Egypt—her sister and an unwitting freshman in tow.Great.Mysterious and beautiful, Egypt is more than they could have ever imagined from their days in the classroom. History comes alive as the three teens realize that getting back to the present will be the most difficult thing they’ve ever done. Stalked by vicious monsters called Scorpions, every step in the right direction means a step closer to danger.As Portia and the girls discover that they’re linked to the past by more than just chance, they have to decide what it truly means to be yourself, to love your sister, and to find your way home.

When I saw this one on Netgalley, read it’s synopsis and spotted the words ‘ancient Egypt’ ‘time travel’ and ‘monsters’, I was hooked. Luckily, my review request got accepted and I’m currently reading it! I’m 30% in so far and I’m not loving it yet, but I’m sure it’s going to get better.